How to spend 10,000 hours wisely

It’s not the amount of time you spend testing that will make you an expert, it’s how you spend that time. If you plan on spending 10,000 hours testing, make sure you spend it wisely! As James Bach once said in on our blog:

Pretty good testing is easy to do (that’s partly why some people like to say “testing is dead”– they think testing isn’t needed as a special focus because they note that anyone can find at least some bugs some of the time).

Excellent testing is quite *hard* to do.

Yet as I travel all over the world, teaching testing and consulting in testing organizations, I see the same pattern almost *everywhere*: testing groups who have but a vague, wispy idea what they are trying to do; experienced testers who barely read about and don’t systematically practice their craft beyond the minimum needed to keep their employers from firing them; testers whose practice is dominated by irrational and ignorant demands of their management, because those testers have done nothing to develop their own credibility; programmers who think their automated checks will save them from disaster in the field.

How does one learn to test? You can’t get an undergraduate degree in testing. I know of two people who have a PhD in testing, one of whom I admire (Meeta Prakash), the other one is, in my view, an active danger to himself and the craft. I personally know, by name, about 150 testers who are systematically and diligently improving their skills. There are probably another several hundred I’ve met over the years and lost touch with. About three thousand people regularly read my blog, so maybe there are a lot of lurkers. A relative handful of the people I know are part of a program of study/mentoring that is sanctioned by their employers. I know of two large companies that are attempting to systematically implement the Rapid Testing methodology, which is organized around skill development, rather than memorizing vocabulary words and templates. Most testers are doing it independently, however, or even in defiance of their employers.

Yes, there is TMap, TPI, ISTQB, ISEB, and many proprietary testing methodologies out there. I see them as crystallized blobs of uncritical folklore; confused thinking about testing frozen in place like fossilized tree sap. These models and procedures have been created by consultants and consulting companies to justify themselves. They neither promote skill or require skill. They promote what I call “ceremonial software testing” rather than systematic critical thinking about complex technology.

Just about the best thing a tester can do to begin to develop testing skill in a big way is not to read or study any test methodology. Ignore vocabulary words. Toss aside templates. No, what that tester should do is read Introduction to General Systems Thinking, by Gerald M. Weinberg. Read it all the way through. Read it, young tester, and feel your mind get blown. Read it, and meditate on its messages, and do the exercises it recommends, and you will find yourself on a new path to testing excellence.

So if you plan on making testing a career – that is, spending 10K+ hours – here are some practice tips courtesy of Fortune Magazine:

  1. Approach each critical task with an explicit goal of getting much better at it.
  2. As you do the task, focus on what’s happening and why you’re doing it the way you are.
  3. After the task, get feedback on your performance from multiple sources. Make changes in your behavior as necessary.
  4. Continually build mental models of your situation – your industry, your company, your career. Enlarge the models to encompass more factors.
  5. Do those steps regularly, not sporadically. Occasional practice does not work.

http://blog.utest.com/would-10000-hours-of-testing-make-you-an-expert/2013/05/

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